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Archery hunting in the hot, dry weather

Mid-August is one of the best times to hunt mule deer adn elk with a bow. Many hunter's have learned through trial and error, that the hotter it is, the harder is for deer and elk to smell. And, with that defense not functioning at full potential, the hunter has an added advantage.

If you have much experience hunting behind bird dogs, you've probably discovered that the dogs have a much more difficult time smelling birds in hot weather. The same holds true with big game animals.

Also under drier than normal conditions, animals tend to stay fairly close to their primary water source. This gives you as the hunter an advantage. And by hunting near and around the water source, your chance of seeing them increases greatly.

When hunting in dry weather, tree stands and ground blinds carefully positioned around waterholes, along creek bottoms, of on a trail leading to a creek, spring or waterhole can be very effective. Just like any other animal, deer and elk need water. And though many big bucks will often avoid getting their water during daylight hours, it does happens.

Hunting the high country in hot weather is also a great tactic for big bucks. Some of the best hunting available can be found at or above timberline. In August, bucks like to lounge on the high slopes, soak up a little sun, and the breeze keeps the flies off their velvet covered antlers.

In some of the better areas, you will often find the bucks in bachelor groups in August, and it's not uncommon to see 5, 6, or even a dozen bucks feeding together on a steep mountain slope. Of course they're very difficult to get close to under those circumstances with all those eyes, hears, and noses searching for any possible danger. But, that's what makes it so much fun.